Track 3

Housing and Community Development

  • Luciana Lago
    • Federal University of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)
    • lucianacorrealago@gmail.com
  • Ed Blakely
    • blakelyglobal@gmail.com
  • Mai Nguyen
    • University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (USA)
    • mai@unc.edu

People around the globe are profoundly affected by the housing and the communities in which they live. This contemporary period of rapid urbanization, global migration, and rising income and wealth inequality poses unique challenges to housing and community development scholarship, policy and practice. Therefore, this session will focus on contemporary issues facing communities around the globe as they try to house the most disadvantaged and socially vulnerable populations. Possible research questions include:

  • What new approaches to housing/shelter are emerging to house the most disadvantaged and socially vulnerable?
  • What forms of organizations/institutions (community development, cooperatives) are occupying or playing roles in both the struggles and the interventions to gain better outcomes for affected disadvantaged communities?
  • In a rapidly changing and globalizing world, what forms of community control can or should community members exercise over their individual and collective destinies?
  • How is housing/shelter part of a broader social spatial justice movement in communities around the world?
  • As the disparity in income and wealth rises, what forms of grassroots resistance/response have arisen, particularly in communities of color, barrios of disadvantage and/or informal/illegal settlement?
  • Can housing policy and/or community development interventions gain better outcomes for affected disadvantaged communities? How?
  • Papers should offer empirical analysis in some form, including quantitative analyses and qualitative analyses (e.g. rich case studies and ethnographic interviews). Comparative research is strongly encouraged. Conceptual or theoretical papers will also be considered if they are connected to empirical work. When possible, papers should include proposals for policy intervention and/or action.